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University of California Santa Barbara
Planning Data Book

Data Sources & Explanation of Measurements

Data terms that appear in the Planning Data Book/Academic Unit Profile are listed below in alphabetical order. Click on the term to learn how the measures are calculated and how the data is collected. When data is reported in multiple sections, slight differences may occur when numbers are rounded.

Admissions

Source: Office of Admissions Planning File, Graduate Division Applicant File, Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File

Undergraduate applicant statistics are based on complete applications received for fall quarter admissions. At the undergraduate level, admission statistics include those prospective students who have been offered fall admission to UCSB. The admit rate (% admitted) is calculated by dividing the number of prospective students admitted by the number of complete applications received. Enrolled is the number of prospective students who actually enrolled at the campus by the 15th class day of their entering fall quarter. The take rate (% matriculating) is the result of dividing the number of new students who enrolled at the campus by the number admitted.

At the graduate level, the number of applicants is based upon the total number of applications forwarded to the Graduate Division by individual departments. Graduate students who defer admission are included in the application and admissions data for the year into which they have been deferred.

Allocated Faculty/Staff FTE

Source: Academic Personnel File, Budget Office Permanent Budget File

Allocated faculty FTE equals the number of full time faculty “budgeted” to the campus annually by the University of California system. Permanent FTE data include the permanent FTE allocated or budgeted to the department for the year as reported by the Office of Academic Personnel. Permanent FTE are filled by ladder-rank faculty and includes faculty on paid leaves and sabbaticals. In some cases, dollars from the permanent FTE allocation are used for Budgetary Savings Target (BST). Temporary FTE data include temporary FTE allocated to departments by the colleges for the year (July 1 through June 30). Temporary FTE are generally filled by appointees in temporary classifications (e.g., visiting faculty, Unit 18). Temporary FTE is determined by the colleges and reported to the Office of Academic Personnel. Teaching Assistant FTE data include FTE allocated to departments by the colleges in response to requests based on workload needs.

Staff FTE is based upon the FTE permanently budgeted to the department (division/college) in the sub 1 account as of July 1 of the academic year.

Annual Expenditures

Source: Budget Office General Ledger File

Funds expended by departments throughout the academic year (July 1-June 30) are recorded by function, sub-account, and fund source. NOTE: Dollars expended in the 'Research' function may not include dollars expended by Organized Research Units (ORU's) affiliated with the department.

Class Size

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR Files

Average class size is based upon enrollment in regular courses. Also provided are the percentages of regular courses at each level that have enrollments greater than or equal to 100 students and those with enrollments below the minimum policy. UCSB’s Academic Senate policy on minimum class size establishes norms for minimum class sizes at 12 students for lower division courses, 8 for upper division, and 4 students for graduate level courses. The policy also provides for exceptions to the minimum policy and procedures for reviewing courses that are taught below the minimum norms.

Course Offerings

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR File

The items in this section refer to regular course offerings. Regular courses are primary sections of general assembly courses and do not include independent study, thesis, dissertation, or other exceptional instruction.

  • Lower division = courses numbered 1 to 99
  • Upper division = courses numbered 100 to 199
  • Graduate level = courses numbered 200 or above

Degrees Conferred

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File, UCOP Degrees Conferred File

This section includes the total number of degrees conferred during an academic year based on a summer through spring cycle, and the percent of degree recipients who are foreign, female, underrepresented, and minorities. The percent of underrepresented and minority degree recipients are based on the definitions provided in the ethnicity and gender section on page ii. Similar to the enrollment by ethnicity elements, the percentages of underrepresented and minority degree recipients are based on the number of domestic degree recipients, while the percentages of foreign and female degree recipients are based on the total number of degree recipients.

Enrolled Student Academic Achievement

Source: Office of Admissions Planning File, Graduate Division Applicant File, Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File

This section contains the same data elements as the New Student Academic Achievement section (see above), for all students enrolled for the fall quarter of the respective academic years. At the undergraduate level, data is reported based on the admission status of students when they entered UCSB (freshman vs. transfer). For example, if a department has 21 undergraduate student majors of various class levels enrolled as of Fall 1994, 14 of whom entered UCSB as new freshmen and 7 who entered as transfer students, the high school GPA and SAT score data would be based upon the 14 undergraduates in the department who entered the university as freshmen, and the transfer college GPA would be based on the admissions records of the 7 majors who entered as transfer students.

Faculty Hires and Separations

Source: Academic Personnel

This section reports the number of new ladder faculty hires in the year the new hire begins working at UCSB and faculty separations during the academic year as reported by Academic Personnel. These figures do not include intra-campus transfers (personnel transferring between departments within UCSB).

Faculty Profile

Source: Academic Personnel File, Office of Equal Opportunity

This section provides demographic characteristics of ladder faculty in the department (division/college). The characteristics include gender, ethnicity, average years at current rank, average faculty salaries, average age, and average years of service. Distribution of age and years of service are also provided.

Graduate Student Support

Source: Financial Aid and Payroll data as compiled by Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment

Graduate student support encompasses financial aid and graduate earnings through university employment. The data in this section reflect actual awards distributed and earnings paid out for the fiscal year. Graduate student support falls under six main categories: fellowships and grants, academic apprentice salaries (earnings from teaching/research assistantships), tuition and fee support (fee remission and tuition remission), GSHIP payments, other financial aid (loans and work study), and other UC employment (salary earnings from non-apprentice positions). Most these categories are subdivided even further for greater detail of support source. The total dollar amount of graduate support administered by the university and received by students in the department is listed, as well as the average financial support per graduate student who received various forms of aid.

Graduation Rates

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File, UCOP Degrees Conferred File

Based on an entering Fall cohort, graduation rates tell what percentage of the cohort graduated within a specified amount of elapsed time. As undergraduate students often change majors, graduation rates for undergraduates are only given on the total campus profile.

Graduation rates for graduate students are based upon the department and degree objective of a student at the time of matriculation to the campus. In the case of a student beginning a masters or doctoral program in one department and completing the degree in another department (i.e., changing majors, which is relatively uncommon at the graduate level), the student’s success in completing the degree will be reflected in the original department’s graduation rate. In the case of a student indicating both a masters and a doctoral degree objective, the student was classified as a doctoral student for the calculation of graduation rates.

The designated time period for graduation rates is based on a fall through summer cycle. Five-year graduation rate is reported for undergraduates on the campus tables only. Three-year graduation rates are used for masters students. Eight-year graduation rates are reported for Ph.D. students. For example, the 1997-98 column would reflect how many of the masters’ students who entered UCSB in fall 1995 had graduated by the end of summer 1998. Similarly, the doctorate graduation rate in the same column would be based upon doctoral students who entered UCSB in fall 1990 and completed their degree by the end of summer 1998. The cohort’s entering year and initial number of students are provided along with the graduation rates.

Instructional Load Enrollment Data

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File, Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR File, Budget Office Permanent Budget File

Page 12 of the academic unit profiles contains instructional load data, as well as Fall undergraduate majors (a split headcount is used to preserve historical comparability), Fall course enrollment (sum of all course enrollments for the department/division /college), and Fall campus total enrollment (headcount), in a historical view as far back as 1970-71.

Instructional Load/Student FTE

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR Data File

Student FTE (also known as “Instructional Load”) represents the three-quarter average student “full-time equivalency.” Full-time equivalency for undergraduate students is 15 units per quarter, while graduate student full-time equivalency is 12 units, although for campus planning purposes, FTE for graduate students is based on graduate headcount, not the number of units generated by graduate course enrollment.

Undergraduate Student FTE is based upon the Student Credit Units (SCUs) generated by the department for each quarter divided by 15. The three-quarter average is calculated by summing the student FTE for Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters and dividing by three. The three-quarter average graduate headcount for the department is then added to the three-quarter average undergraduate student FTE to arrive at the Total Student FTE for the department (division/college).

Example: Instructional Load FTE Computation by Department

Course Students Units SCUs FTE
Class #1 30 4 120 8
Class #2 5 375 25
Class #3 30 3 90 6
585 39
Therefore: 585 SCUs / 15 = 39 FTE

Historically, undergraduate student FTE has been calculated based on the course department, independent of the department in which the instructor has an appointment. For example, the English department receives student FTE credit for enrollment in all English courses, irrespective of who is teaching them. In recent years, an additional undergraduate student FTE has been calculated based on the home department of the course instructors. In this case, if the home department of the instructor of record for an English course were a department other than English, the other department would receive workload credit for the student FTE generated by the English course, not the English department.

Mean Grade Assigned in Undergraduate Courses

Source: Registrar / Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Grade Distribution Reports

This measure is based on the average grades given in undergraduate courses offered by the department (division/college) for each quarter.

Median Time to Degree for Graduates

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File, UCOP Degrees Conferred File

This figure is the median time to degree in elapsed years for all students who graduated in the given year. It is calculated by counting the number of quarters between the students’ first quarter at UCSB and the quarter they obtained their degree. For example, a time of 4.25 elapsed years would represent four years plus one quarter. This statistic includes quarters in which students may have been on leave or have lapsed during that time period. Time to degree for baccalaureate recipients is based upon those who entered UCSB as new freshmen (all transfer students excluded). Similar to graduation rates, time to degree for graduate students is based on the degree objective at time of matriculation, with students pursuing both a masters and a doctorate counted in the doctoral cohort.

New Student Academic Achievement

Source: Office of Admissions Planning File, Graduate Division Applicant File

This section describes the performance of new enrolled students on admission criteria for each department, division, or college, based on the major declared at time of admission. For new freshmen this includes the average and inter-quartile range of SAT scores (which, beginning in 2006-07, reflect the revised SAT Reasoning Test), high school grade point average (GPA) based on courses that fulfilled A-F subject area requirements (capped at 4.00), and ADM rates, a score created during the admission process. The ADM rate is a composite index based on high school GPA and standardized test scores, weighted to best predict first year GPA at UCSB.

For new transfer students, the average and inter-quartile range of the transfer college GPA are provided.

For new graduate students, the average and inter-quartile range of undergraduate GPA are listed, as well as the average scores and average percentiles on each section of the general GRE exam (verbal, quantitative, analytical, and beginning 2003-04, analytical writing. The undergraduate GPA is self-reported by the student on his/her Graduate Division application. The averages do not include students who have missing scores. GRE scores for students in the performing arts are excluded in college and campus GRE statistics, as they are not used as criteria for admission into the program.

Percent of Regular Courses Taught by Regular Rank Faculty

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR File, Academic Personnel File

These figures are calculated by dividing the number of regular courses taught by regular rank faculty by the total number of regular courses offered in the academic year. Regular rank faculty includes only permanent instructors carrying the title of Professor, Associate Professor, or Assistant Professor. This percentage should be interpreted with caution as many departments offer large lower division classes taught by regular rank faculty in addition to offering several lower division classes taught by temporary faculty. For this item, course counts are assigned by course department (as in the department offering the course), regardless of the instructor’s home department.

Permanent Budget

Source: Budget Office Permanent Budget File

Funds budgeted to departments on a permanent basis are detailed by the major functions, sub-accounts, and fund sources. The data are based on what has been permanently budgeted as of July 1 of the academic year. The major functions are those listed in University of California Financial Reports, based upon the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) standards.

Personnel Headcount

Source: Academic Personnel File, Payroll/Personnel Files

This section provides the headcount of all faculty and staff within the department (division/college) as of October of the academic year. This includes ladder and non-ladder faculty, other academic appointments, and all non-academic staff.

Academic classifications are based upon ladder and non-ladder positions. Ladder faculty refers to tenure or tenure-track positions and includes Lecturer with Security of Employment (SOE) or Potential Security of Employment (PSOE). Non-ladder positions include lecturers without security of employment, visiting professors, emeriti faculty, and other types of non-ladder faculty positions. Other Academic positions include post-doctoral fellows, professional researchers, teaching associates (graduate students who are listed as teaching and in-charge of a class), teaching assistants, tutors/readers, librarians, and other academic administrators. The headcount for ladder faculty is based on Academic Personnel reports and includes faculty on sabbatical or leave.

Staff personnel are divided into three classifications. The first is Career staff members that are established at a fixed or variable percentage of time at 50% or more of full time that is expected to continue for one year or longer. The second is Contract/Casual staff members, which includes contract staff members that are hired on a temporary basis. It also includes casual staff members that are hired on at any percentage of time for less than one year, or are hired at less than 50% of full time for any duration of the position. The third category is Student Casual (Casual Restricted), for staff members that are student employees.

Regular Courses Taught by Regular Rank Faculty per Filled Faculty FTE

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR File, Academic Personnel File

These figures are calculated by adding up the number of regular courses offered by regular rank faculty in the department, divided by the total number of filled faculty FTE within the department. Unlike “percent of regular courses taught by regular rank faculty,” this data item uses course counts assigned by the instructor’s home department to provide an indication of the total amount of teaching done by the regular rank faculty within the department, regardless of the course department in which the class is offered.

Sponsored Research

Source: Office of Research, Office of Instructional Development, Academic Senate

Most academic research is funded by research grants that are coordinated/reported through the Office of Research. The number and dollar amount of grant proposals submitted by and awarded to faculty for academic research are listed by the year of proposal submission and the year grants were awarded. A grant proposal submitted in one year and awarded in another will show up in the separate years under the appropriate category. Multi-year grants may be recorded in the year the grant was first awarded, according to the legal commitment of the grant.

In cases where multiple investigators are listed on a research grant, the award is credited to the first principal investigator, as designated by the group of faculty researchers who have submitted the grant.

Actual research expenditures are reported by fiscal year. These expenditures reflect dollars expended by the department alone (according to its current organizational structure) and may not include research dollars processed through any affiliated Organized Research Units.

The Average Award Dollars per Faculty represents the total research dollars awarded by home department in the fiscal year divided by the ladder-rank faculty headcount of the department.

Instructional Improvement grants are awarded by the Office of Instructional Development to aid faculty in improving instruction in the classroom. The amount of Instructional Improvement grants awarded to the department (division/college) is listed.

Grants allocated by the Academic Senate for Academic Research are also reported. The total includes both travel and research grants awarded to the department (division/college). Research grants are reported to reflect the grant period that awardees can access and use the funds. Travel grants are made on a per-request basis, thus reported the year the grant was awarded.

Student Credit Units by Faculty Rank

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR Data File

Student credit units (SCU), also known as student credit hours (SCH), equal the number of students in a course multiplied by the unit value of the course. Data shown are three-quarter averages of SCU’s, broken out by regular and exceptional instruction at each course level and then by faculty rank based on the sum of regular and exceptional instruction SCU’s. Permanent faculty SCUs include courses taught by full, associate, and assistant professors, as well as lecturers with security of employment. “Other” includes any non-ladder instructors, such as lecturers, librarians, researchers, teaching associates/assistants, and administrative staff. The faculty rank assigned to a course, ladder vs. other, depends upon who is teaching the course. When a teaching assistant teaches a lab course but a full professor is in charge of the course, the credit assigned for the TA lab course is at the TA level and is counted in the “other faculty” category. For team-taught courses, student credit units are evenly divided among the faculty members teaching the course.

Student Ethnicity and Gender

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File

In the Ethnicity Summary Tables (Section E), enrollment is based on the fall quarter headcount. In the academic unit profiles, enrollment by ethnicity and gender is based on the department three-quarter average headcount explained above.

Enrollment by ethnicity is based on domestic students who are U.S. citizens, immigrants, permanent residents, refugees, and students granted amnesty or political/religious asylum. Ethnic percentages reported in the Planning Data Book are based upon all domestic students, including those who did not indicate their ethnicity. Previous editions of the PDB excluded domestic students who declined to state their ethnicity in the domestic students base. Percent Underrepresented are students that are considered underrepresented in the University of California system. This group includes students that report their ethnicity as Native American Indian, African-American, Chicano, or Latino. Percent Minority includes underrepresented groups as well as students who report their ethnicity as Filipino, East Indian/Pakistani, or other Asian.

All other students are reported as Foreign (students with international visas). The percentage of female and foreign students is based on the total number of majors in the department, division, or college.

Student Headcount

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File

Headcount is based on the number of students enrolled as a major or pre-major of the department as of the 15th class day of the quarter. The three-quarter average is the sum of the enrollment of the three regular academic quarters (Fall, Winter, Spring) divided by three.

Double/triple majors are counted at full value for each major at the department, division, and college levels, with no duplication within a single division or college. For example, if a student majors in political science and anthropology, both the Political Science and the Anthropology departments would receive a full headcount for the student. But the division of Social Sciences would only receive one full headcount for the student.

Beginning in 2007-08, duplication within a single department was removed so that students with two majors offered by the same department are counted only once within the department. For example, if a student majors in Japanese and Asian Studies, which are both offered through the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultural Studies, the department receives only one full headcount for the student.

On page 12 of the academic unit profiles the fall undergraduate majors count is a split headcount where double and triple majors are split between their major departments, so that a double major is counted as 1/2 for each major, and a triple major is counted as 1/3. This is done in order to provide historical comparability, as the split count was used in reporting prior to 1992.

Student/Faculty Ratios

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR File, Academic Personnel File

The student/faculty ratio equals the total student FTE (undergraduate + graduate) divided by the total allocated faculty FTE (permanent + temporary). Numerous student/faculty ratios can be derived from the various student FTE and faculty FTE numbers given. The first student/faculty ratio in the academic unit profiles is based on the student FTE calculated by course department. The second ratio is based on the student FTE calculated by home department. The Undergraduate Student/TA ratio equals the total undergraduate FTE, calculated by course department, divided by the allocated TA FTE. In the instructional load tables in section A, a weighted student faculty ratio is also provided, based on both the total allocated and filled faculty FTE.

Time to Candidacy

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment Statistical Extract File, UCOP Degrees Conferred File

Median time to candidacy is reported for all students who advanced to candidacy in the given year. It is calculated by counting the elapsed time between a doctoral student’s first quarter and the quarter s/he advanced.

UCSB Grade Point Average of Majors

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment End of Term Statistical Extract File

This measure is the three-quarter average cumulative GPA of undergraduate students who are majors within the department (division/college). Only grade points earned in UC courses are included.

  • A+ = 4.0
  • A = 4.0
  • A- = 3.7
  • B+ = 3.3
  • B = 3.0
  • B- = 2.7
  • C+ = 2.3
  • C = 2.0
  • C- = 1.7
  • D+ = 1.3
  • D = 1.0
  • D- = 0.7
  • F = 0.0

Weighted Student FTE

Source: Institutional Research, Planning & Assessment IRAL/DSIR Data File

This measure of student enrollment (included in the instructional load tables in Section A) takes into account the relative instructional costs of different levels of students. Based on studies of costs by level of student, the University and the State of California in the mid-1960s adopted a system of weights that were used through the mid-1970s for allocation of Faculty FTE. Although the State no longer recognizes this method, the University of California used the weights for internal allocation to the campuses through 1996-97. These weights are listed as follows:

Student Level - Weight
Lower Division - 1
Upper Division - 1.5
Graduate Level 1 - 2.5
Graduate Level 2 - 3.5

The assumption is that an Upper Division Budget FTE student is 1.5 times costlier than a Lower Division Budget FTE student. A Ph.D. student who is advanced to candidacy (G2) is 3.5 times costlier than a Lower Division student is.